Tuesday, July 04, 2017

King David Series: David vs. Goliath

Do you remember the story of David vs. Goliath?

How many of you are old enough to remember the Sunday morning cartoon of Davey and Goliath? It was a claymation cartoon that started in 1960 and ended in 2004.

"In this stop-action animated series, young Davey Hansen and his best friend (and dog) Goliath live ordinary suburban American lives. In each episode, Davey and Goliath experience some form of moral conflict either in themselves or in their friends. Drawing upon the guidance of his parents, his teachers, and his own religious beliefs, Davey doesn't always do the right thing, but he does always come away from the experience having learned valuable moral and life lessons." 
The version in the Bible is not about a boy and his dog.

Even though the prophet, Samuel, had anointed David to become the next king of Israel, he was still too young and had much to learn. God would teach David many lessons before becoming king.

Saul remained king even though he'd been stripped of God's Spirit and Samuel's counsel.

Saul took is army to battle the Philistines. Each army stood on the top of an opposing hill with a valley between them.

Goliath, the champion of the Philistines, taunted Saul's army to send out a man to fight. In ancient times, wars were sometimes decided through champions from each side who met in combat in a location between the armies. It was thought that the outcome of the fight was controlled by the warrior's gods more than by the military strength of the two sides.

Goliath was over nine feet tall, massive, and extremely intimidating. Saul's army reacts with terror and dismay.  No one comes out to meet Goliath's challenge for forty days.

Was it coincidence that David appears on the battlefield to hear Goliath's latest challenge?

No, not at all. Once again, God's plans are set in place.

Jesse, David's father, sends him with food supplies for his brothers fighting in Saul's army. He gives the food supplies to to the keeper of supplies and runs out to the field and greets his brothers. While there, he hears Goliath's shouts.

The men in the army tell David that that Saul promises great wealth to the man who kills Goliath, his daughter, and the victor's family tax exemption.

David is disgusted that no one has defeated this disgrace to Israel who defies their Lord. David's oldest brother, Eliab, is angry that David is on the field and presumptuous enough to speak out. As the oldest of all David's brothers, Eliab was upset that he'd been passed over by Samuel during David's anointing.

Despite Saul's army losing faith in the size of their God and fearing the size of Goliath, David does not. David understands that God is everything -- He is ever-present, ever-powerful, and ever-watchful. He knows his God and knows that nothing is impossible for Him.

David tells the soldiers near his brothers that he can fight. He's overheard, a message is sent to Saul, and Saul sends for David.

"David said to Saul, "Let no one lose heart on account of their Philistine; your servant will go and fight him." - 1 Samuel 17:32

"Saul replied, "You are not able to go out against this Philistine and fight him; you are only a young man, and he has been a warrior from his youth." - 1 Samuel 17:33

David convinces Saul by telling him that he'd been keeping his father's sheep, he'd fought a lion and bear and he'd kill the Philistine who defied the armies of the living God. David convinces king Saul that the Lord has prepared him for this moment. God had tested David's courage, given him the opportunity to use his strength, and taught David to depend on Him in times of trouble.

Saul is convinced. He dresses David in his own tunic, puts a coat of armor on him and a bronze helmet on his head. However, David can't walk in this gear, so he removes it all, picks up his staff, chooses five smooth stones from the stream and put them in his pouch,  and walks toward the Philistine, Goliath, with his sling in his hand.

Amused, Goliath looks at David, a boy, and "he said to David, Am I a dog, that you come at me with sticks?" - 1 Samuel 17:43

David doesn't see a giant monster who intimidated Israel's army for forty days, he sees only the size of his God. He sees the victory before the battle has ever begun. His words to Goliath are:

"You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hands, and I'll strike you down and cut off your head. This very day I will give the carcasses of the Philistine army to the birds and the wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord's, and He will give all of you into our hands." - 1 Samuel 17:45-47

This is a lesson we can all learn. Our faith can be strengthened by the power of God's promises. Nothing is hidden from God's sight. He knows not only what is happening today, but what will be tomorrow. We must remember that our God is bigger than any problem, any struggle, and any circumstance. This helps us to face our giants and keep those distorted, dark, discouraging moments in perspective.

The battle was over in seconds. The Philistine, Goliath, moved toward David, intent on attacking him. However, David ran toward the battle line, reached into his pouch, removed a stone, put it in his slingshot and slung the stone toward Goliath hitting him in the forehead.

"So David triumphed over the Philistine with a sling and a stone; without a sword in his hand he struck down the Philistine and killed him." - 1 Samuel 17:50

The Philistine army runs away and the Israelites army wins the day.

David took the dead Philistine's sword, cut off his head and took it to Saul. Saul asks about David's lineage. David tells him he is the son of Jesse of Bethlehem, Saul's servant.

David's battle with Goliath is a portrait of the battle that surrounds us every day. Like this ancient battle, the champions of each side are fighting. The representative of evil verses the representative of the godly. Whatever happens to the champion decides the fate of the people on their side.

The battle is not between us and Satan, it is between christ and Satan. In the spiritual struggle between good and evil, Jesus has already won the battle. If we align ourselves with Jesus, then His victory is ours.

Next in the King David Series: Saul Fears David.





Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Find Your Heart's Joy Christian Counseling / Coaching

Please join me as I open the doors and my heart to Christian Counseling / Coaching.

Find Your Heart's Joy is a culmination of a life long pursuit of my purpose in life.

Please look around, don't mind the construction still going on....  I was very eager to get the doors open and the paint is a bit wet.

There is also a Facebook page you can join and a private discussion group.


If you have any questions at all, please don't hesitate to contact me!!!

Looking forward to helping you find your heart's joy!!



Wednesday, March 01, 2017

King David Series: David's Service to Saul


God empowered David's mind and muscles to bring future deliverance for the nation of Israel. When the Spirit of the Lord came upon David, it left Saul.


For David, it was a seal from God, denoting His ownership and a deposit guaranteeing David's inheritance in the heavenly realms.


However, without God's Spirit in Saul, he became depressed, hopeless. These feelings probably were the reason for Saul's fits of rage.


However, it has been suggested that without God's Spirit, it left Saul vulnerable to a demonic influence.




1 Samuel 16:14 "Now the Spirit of the Lord had departed from Saul, and an evil spirit from the Lord tormented him."



Even though God rejected Saul as king, remember that God wanted Saul to belong to Him. In the midst of heavy darkness flowing from Saul's rebellion, God continued to call Saul to repentance and redemption.

God uses Saul's torment to bring David to the king's court.

1 Samuel 16:15-23 Saul's attendants said to him. "See, an evil spirit from God is tormenting you. Let our lord command his servants here to search for someone who can play the harp. He will play when the evil spirit from God comes upon you, and you will feel better." 
So Saul said to his attendants, "Find someone who plays well and bring him to me."
One of the servants answered, "I have seen a son of Jesse of Bethlehem who knows how to play the harp. He is a brave man and a warrior. He speaks well and is a fine-looking man. And the Lord is with him."
Then Saul sent messengers to Jesse and said, "Send me your son David, who is with the sheep." So Jesse took a donkey loaded with bread, a skin of wine and a young goat and sent them with his son David to Saul. David came to Saul and entered his service. Saul liked him very much, and David became one of his armor-bearers. Then Saul sent word to Jesse, saying, "Allow David to remain in my service, for I am pleased with him." Whenever the spirit from God came upon Saul, David would take his harp and play. Then relief would come to Saul; he would feel better, and the evil spirit would leave him.


Music is powerful. It has the ability to teach the mind, soothe the soul, refocuses the heart, and move the body. Our music on earth is but a reflection of the music that fills heaven. - Casandra Martin - "Echoing His Heartbeat, The Life of David"

Do you use music to help you cope with your varying emotions and moods?

Music also can be an effective coping strategy. We can listen to music that elicits emotions we want to feel in a given moment. If we feel lazy and unmotivated, maybe a playlist of uptempo, energetic songs would be a helpful way to change our mood. It could be interesting to create playlists based on various emotions so they’re within reach as desired. 
In summary, while music can move us in an acute emotional moment, it’s also notable that it can be used to elicit underlying emotions and teach us about unconscious elements of our emotional structure. If we notice a pattern of emotional music that raises questions about current feelings or about who we are, it could be a worthwhile opportunity for self-exploration. - How Music Impacts Our Emotions
1 Peter 2:9 describes the songs that should define us. "But you are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that you may declare the praises of Him who called you out of darkness into His wonderful light."

The reason we are chosen is so we can exist so people can say, "What a great God!"

By identifying with the powerful impact of David's music, imagine what your life would be like if you used music for its highest purpose - focusing your mind and heart on God.

Zephaniah 3:17 "The Lord your God is with you, He is mighty to save. He will take great delights in you, He will quiet you with His love. He will rejoice over you with singing."

This is your challenge. Choose songs about Jesus or listen to music that glorifies God. Work to incorporate praise music in your day-today activities and family time. You may experience resistance. Satan. Satan doesn't want you to use music to focus on God.

Sing songs that declare the wonder and glory of God. What a Great God!!





The King David Series continues. Up Next: David vs. Goliath

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

King David Series: The Boy After God's Heart

David's beginning starts with Ruth who married Boaz. Ruth was a trusting woman; advised by Naomi, her mother-in-law, whom she dearly loved.

Naomi trusted God. Even through all her tragedies, Naomi knew God would bring her great blessings. When Ruth married Boaz, then gave birth to a son, Obed, the father of Jesse, the father of David, Naomi's life and legacy were significant. She lived in faithfulness to God, knowing that the significance of her life will extend beyond her lifetime. (Ruth Chapters 3-4)

David became her reward.

Israel demanded a king. Samuel, the prophet heard God and prepared Saul as Israel's first King. By anointing Saul, indicating that Saul was God's representative to the people. This special anointing oil was a mixture of olive oil, myrrh, and other expensive spices. It was poured the king's head to symbolize the presence and power of the Holy Spirit of God in his life. This anointing ceremony was to remind the king of his great responsibility  to lead his people by God's wisdom and not his own. (1 Samuel Chapters 8, 9, 10)

Saul presented the ideal visual image of a king, but the tendencies of his character often went contrary to God's commands for a king. Saul was God's chosen leader, but this did not mean he was capable of being king on his own.

Saul's greatest successes were when he obeyed God. His greatest failures were a result of disobeying God and acting on his own.

God loved His people, the Israelites. He granted their request for a king, but His commands and requirements remained the same. God was to be their true King and both Saul and the people were to be subject to His laws. No person is EVER exempt from God's laws. No human action is outside His jurisdiction. God is the true King of area of life. We must recognize His kingship and pattern our relationships, work life, and home life according to His principles.

God rejects Saul for his disobedience and rejects Saul as King. The Lord guides Samuel to a new leader. A new King. (1 Samuel Chapters 13, 14, 15)

In secret, God sends Samuel to Jesse of Bethlehem and his sons to consecrate themselves and sacrifice with him. Samuel knew he was there to choose the next king. Jesse paraded seven of his oldest sons before Samuel, but God did not choose any of them. (1 Samuel 16: 1-10)

Saul was tall and handsome; a very impressive looking man. Samuel may have been trying to find someone who look like Saul to be Israel's next King. But God warned Samuel against judging by appearance alone.

When people judge by outward appearance, they may overlook quality individuals who last the particular physical qualities society currently admires. Appearance doesn't reveal what people are really like or what their true value is.

Fortunately, God judges by faith and character, not appearances. And because only God can see on the inside, only he can accurately judge people. Most people spend hours each week maintaining their outward appearance; they should do even more to develop their inner character. While everyone sees your face, only you and God know what your heart really looks like.

What steps are you taking to improve your heart's attitude?


Samuel asked if Jesse had any other sons. Jesse replied that his youngest was in the fields tending the sheep. Samuel asked that this son be sent for and brought forth.

David appeared in glowing health, with a fine appearance and handsome features. God spoke to Samuel saying,"this is the one. Anoint him." (1 Samuel 16:11-12)









Samuel uses the horn of oil to anoint David in the presence of his brothers, and from that day on the Spirit of the Lord came powerfully upon David. (1 Samuel 16:13)












While Saul was still King, God prepared David for his future responsibilities.

What are your first impressions of David?


  • Shepherd
  • Poet
  • Giant-killer
  • King
  • Ancestor of Jesus

One of the greatest men in the Old Testament.

David also had failures:

  • Betrayer
  • Liar
  • Adulter
  • Murderer

However, above all else, David is known, respected, and admired, for his heart for God.

Acts 13:22 "God testified concerning him: 'I have found David son of Jesse, a man after my own heart, he will do everyone I want him to do.'"

David, more than anything else, had an unchangeable belief in the faithful and forgiving nature of God. He was a man who lived with great zest. He sinned many times, but he was quick to confess his sins. His confessions were from the heart, and his repentance was genuine. David never took God's forgiveness lightly or His blessing for granted. In return, God never held back from David either His forgiveness or the consequences of his actions. David experienced the joy of forgiveness even when he had to suffer the consequences of his sins.

We tend to get these two reversed. Too often we would rather avoid the consequences than experience  forgiveness. Another big difference between us and David is that while he sinned greatly, he did not sin repeatedly. He learned from his mistakes because he accepted the suffering they brought. Often we don't seem to learn from our mistakes or the consequences that result from those mistakes.

What changes would it take for God to find this kind of obedience in you?








The King David Series continues. Up Next: David's Service to Saul.